Selling or buying property during COVID-19

One thing is certain, the property market has been paralysed by lockdown. However, the tide is turning so if you are looking to put your home on the market or wanting to purchase a property take note. The advance of modern technology has made everything possible now.  360 Virtual viewings are now an option and your agents can be contacted via email, with some offering video consultations. Sellers, if you are, or have been thinking about putting your property on the market – don’t delay. Now is the time to…

Covid-19: Help with your mortgage

During these unprecedented times, many homeowners and buy to let landlords will have a fear of what will happen with their home or investment property if they cannot continue to make mortgage payments. Unlike the provisions to protect residential and commercial tenants from eviction, mortgage holidays from UK lenders are (as things stand) not enforced by law. The policy adopted by most lenders is the consequence of an agreement between the government and principle lenders, but, this scheme is voluntary and does not have to be supported by a lender…

Landlords must comply with latest energy standards

Landlords of residential property could face high fines if they do not meet the latest energy efficiency standards.  On 1st April 2020, the latest stage of the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards was implemented, making it unlawful for landlords to continue domestic residential tenancies where the property has a rating of F or G on its Energy Performance Certificate – commonly known as an EPC. Two years ago, the first stage of implementation introduced the requirement for an E rating or above for all new tenancies granted. Now, that is extended…

Covid-19: Residential properties – Update

The current situation with the Coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic has created a lot of unknowns and concerns throughout the property market. The Government has made several assurances in the recent news conferences in the past few weeks aimed at both Landlords and Tenants, outlining how both will be afforded assurance and protection in such turbulent times over the coming months. On the 26th of March the Coronavirus Act 2020 was passed, this gave royal assent to many of the measures which were promised. http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2020/7/contents/enacted/data.htm Residential tenants now have protection from eviction…

Mum and Dad need to get with it

Parents who help their children get on the property ladder are being urged to adopt a more professional approach when it comes to handing over the cash.  Faced with high rental costs and soaring property prices, more parents are dipping into savings or releasing capital from their own property to support the next generation. Research by Legal & General estimates that a massive £6.3bn was provided last year by the Bank of Mum and Dad – or BoMaD - as it’s known.  The figure effectively makes BoMaD the 11th largest mortgage…

Indoor Radon levels dangerously increasing

Following the recent sequence of protests at Heathrow Airport and Central London, we have witnessed the rise of the Extinction Rebellion movement. Social media and news coverage has very much brought the debate on the unprecedented global climate emergency and the government’s inaction to implement changes to the forefront. However and ironically so, maybe we should be looking closer to home or should I say within our homes. Recent research into the amount of indoor radon concentrations in our homes suggests that the planet’s need to create more energy efficient…

Can’t afford to get on the property ladder? Shared ownership could be an option

The price of properties, even so-called ‘first-time homes’ are completely out of proportion to the average income. To save for a deposit on your first home is now taking house-hunters (especially first-timers) years longer than before. The ‘Bank of Mum and Dad’ is an option if you’re struggling to get the funds together on your own, but if you don’t have the ability to borrow from family members, or are unable to raise the money for that essential deposit on your own, there is another way to get your foot…

Derelict buildings or structures: who’s responsible?

If you own your own property, then you’re generally responsible for the upkeep of the building. The buck stops with you, whether the property is residential or commercial, and by law you have to ensure it’s safe for members of the public to enter or pass by. If a building falls into disrepair or becomes an eyesore, what rights do neighbours have to force the owner to secure, renovate or, at the very least, tidy up a bit? Impacting the value of your home A run-down property with boarded-up windows,…

Landlords – your legal obligations regarding smoke alarms, CO detectors and other safety features

All landlords have to fulfil certain legal obligations if they’re to rent their property. Some of the most important legal requirements are those that cover basic safety practices and equipment. Keeping tenants safe should be a landlord’s principal concern, so ensuring that these obligations are met is of the utmost importance. Here, we take a look at what landlords have to do when it comes to fire, gas, and electrical safety and also detail the relevant UK legislation. Relevant legislation A landlord’s legal safety obligations are legislated for by a…

How to delist a listed cottage or building

While listed buildings are often attractive, brimming with character and desirable purchases, then can come with potential headaches for the new owners. Listed buildings do not enjoy the freedom associated with new-builds. Often, listed cottages and buildings come with certain restrictions - it is part of the privilege of owning a dwelling that holds historic interest. These can include higher insurance premiums, when compared to non-listed buildings and the requirement for special permission to be granted for works to be undertaken on the property such as the building of an…

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