Covid-19: Help with your mortgage

During these unprecedented times, many homeowners and buy to let landlords will have a fear of what will happen with their home or investment property if they cannot continue to make mortgage payments. Unlike the provisions to protect residential and commercial tenants from eviction, mortgage holidays from UK lenders are (as things stand) not enforced by law. The policy adopted by most lenders is the consequence of an agreement between the government and principle lenders, but, this scheme is voluntary and does not have to be supported by a lender…

Who chooses whether your kids gets vaccinated?

For decades, vaccinations have been regarded as the most important form of defence against childhood illnesses like measles, mumps and rubella (MMR). And for decades, parents happily vaccinated their kids to protect them (and others) without question. Then, around 10 years ago, serious doubts began to be raised as to the safety of vaccines by the now-discredited Andrew Wakefield, who called into question the safety and validity of combination vaccines like MMR. Despite the research eventually being proven to be full of errors and, in fact, flat-out wrong, some parents…

Voluntary Workers – Their rights and your responsibilities as an employer

A volunteer is anyone who carries out unpaid work for a charity, fundraising body or voluntary organisation. If you hire volunteers to work for your organisation, there are certain things you need to be aware of. If you happen to be a volunteer, it pays to know your rights, too. We’ve outlined some of the legalities to help you both stay on the right side of the law. Do voluntary workers have a contract? Although voluntary workers don’t have a contract of employment, most voluntary organisations provide volunteers with a…

When tweets go wrong . . .

Every business using social media should get to grips with publishing law and advertising regulations if they are to avoid reputation-damaging incidents.  The reminder follows the news that opinion columnist Katie Hopkins has been refused leave to appeal against a recent High Court libel verdict, where she was found to have published defamatory tweets, or what’s been coined ‘twibel’. Anyone using social media is a publisher, putting information out into the public domain, but unlike newspapers and book publishers, most businesses don’t have a good understanding of publishing law and…

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