A growing opportunity for London’s waterside warehouses

With e-commerce businesses booming, it is predicted that half of UK retail sales will be online within 10 years. In line with this, there has been a rise in expectations from Consumers when it comes to online purchases, especially, in relation to the quick turn-around of orders and delivery. Covid-19 has changed the way consumers buy goods. More people are happy to order items online without the need to physically see the items beforehand. As a result, it is vital that any e-commerce business considers how improving their warehouse operations…

Interview with Laura Gill of our Residential department

Interview with Laura Gill of our Residential Property department Q: How long have you worked at Bowling & Co? A: I joined the firm approximately 18 months ago and work in the Residential team.  Q: What is the typical time frame for a property transaction to take, from start to finish? A: That's a tough question! It really depends on the type of property transaction. The average would be, say 6 to 8 weeks for a freehold property and around 8 to 12 weeks for a leasehold property. However, those average timescales…

Stamp duty change results in buy-to-let slump

Following the introduction of a stamp duty surcharge in April 2016 mortgage activity in the UK buy-to-let sector has plummeted. Changes implemented in April 2016 resulted in a 3% stamp duty surcharge on buy-to-let and second home purchases. This impelled a sudden surge in lending in February and March 2016 as landlords rushed through purchases to avoid the impending 3% increase in stamp duty tax. However, the spike in mortgage lending was short lived as a sudden and significant drop followed. The Council of Mortgage Lenders (CML) figures show that…

House sellers are facing testing questions

Springtime is traditionally the busiest time for the property market, but with a knotty problem affecting more homes than ever, it’s worth doing some horticultural homework before you start, whether you’re buying or selling. Japanese knotweed is a highly invasive, aggressive and destructive plant, able to grow as high as four metres in just a few months and with roots that can spread seven metres. It’s non-native with no natural predators, and is able to cause significant structural damage, growing through asphalt and other hard surfaces, often compromising building structures.…

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